images + videos

description

MEDIA: Physarum polycephalum, Agar agar, food colours, pencil and aquarell on paper, photographs  
YEAR: 2014

This experiment attempts to implement Kolmogorov's hypothetical computer by means of a biological organism. 

Eight different experiment setups were designed. Pictures were taken over the course of one week. Further drawings were made to abstract the process in a visual language.

 

 

concept text

The so-called plasmodial slime mold is, in this state, the largest acellular organism known in the world. As a biological curiosity this type of slime mould serves as a model organism for network optimisation. It can be interpreted as an ‘actor’ who distributively solves geometric problems.

This property is the basis for the experiment "Growing Kolmogorov-Uspensky Machines". Oat flakes are colour coded (RGB) with food colouring and distributed in different patterns. The grown connections of Physarum polycephalum were observed and documented in drawings. This experiment attempts to implement Kolmogorov's hypothetical computer by means of a biological organism. Unlike the Turing machine, which proposes medium a linear tape as storage, Kolmogorov’s model is based on distributed memory locations.

"A Kolmogorov machine (also known as a Kolmogorov-Uspenski machine) is similar to a Turing machine in most respects except that its storage unit, instead of an unbounded linear tape, is a particular kind of connected graph." (source: esolangs.org.

exhibitions

2016 Inoculum - Connecting the Other, CLB Berlin

2015 Art Laboratory Berlin, August-September 215

references

Scientific collaborator Andy Adamatzky: arxiv.org