images + videos

description

Materials + media: Fuligo septica, Agar agar, petri dishes, scalpel

Presentation: Lightjet prints on AluDibond, paper

Year: 2014

Experiment on edge sensitivity of Fuligo septica. With a scalpel, basic geometries were cut into the surface under sterile conditions. The plasmodial slime mould Fuligo septica was inoculated on a number of prepared petri dishes. 

concept text

Experiment on edge sensitivity of Fuligo septica. The plasmodial slime mould Fuligo septica was inoculated on a number of prepared petri dishes. With a scalpel, basic geometries were cut into the surface under sterile conditions:

- square (a1=15mm, a2=30mm, a3=50mm)

- circle (diameter d1=30mm, d2=50mm, d3=70mm)

- triangle (a1=15mm, a2=30mm, a3=50mm)

Then the slime mould was inoculated either at the center inside the cutted geometry or outside near the edge of a geometric form. Over 2 weeks the foreaging behavior was observed and documented.

The hypothesis was, if Fuligo would align to the cutted edges and thus be able to be controlled in its foreaging behaviour. Also from an aesthetic point of view, it is valuable and original to investigate the potential of self-growing images. The choice of the cutted lines, was for basic geometries as they also form the basis of many visual artworks. The experiments also discuss the potential of how images can be generated by natural processes. As that, they are inherently creative as they use their own body and morphology to create something new.

After 30 experiment rounds I found that in about 50% of cases Fuligo aligns to the edges, in another 50% not or insignificantly. This makes a proper evaluation difficult as I can only speculate about the reason of the edge sensitivity in the first place (more humidity inside edges, more bacteria in cuts…). Further studies are needed to evaluate under which conditions the edge sensitivity could be improved for routing of living wires.  As means of displaying “creativity” – in the sense of the creation of images and architectures – the project were nevertheless an interesting artistic research.

credits

artist: Theresa Schubert

exhibitions

2017 Shared Habitats Kaosiung (TW), 20-30 November 2017

2016 Inoculum - Connecting the Other, CLB Berlin, February 2016